All posts by Hiroyuki Hamada

Do Americans Dream of Capitalist Sheep?

It’s capitalism after all.  Those political parties for the rich and powerful know how to sell exploitation and subjugation by their good cop/bad cop marketing. If you don’t buy this, you get Trump.  But if you buy what they sell, you get Biden, an imperialist with the crime bill, Patriot Act, and the rest of the schemes for the rich and powerful.   W.E.B DuBois talked about this in 1956 saying, “I shall not go to the polls. I have not registered. I believe that democracy has so far disappeared in the United States that no “two evils” exist. There is but one evil party with two names, and it will be elected despite all I can do or say.” I don’t think there was real democracy founded by slave owners, but you get the idea.  Since then, people have kept voting for over a half century.  Now three people own the bottom half of the wealth of the US.  The feudal hierarchy is backed by 800 military bases across the globe with piles of weapons of mass destruction.  In the US, people have no healthcare, education is gutted, no legal rights, 1 out of 5 children are starving and so on.  The system works tremendously well to keep the feudal hierarchy.

Just like any moneyed social institution, the political institution is structured to serve the rich and powerful.  This is just like how colonialism works.  The colonizers come to steal land and resources, and they dominate every aspects of your life.  If you follow the rules shaping the hierarchy, you get to live in reservations as second class citizens.  If you complain, they manage to declare “love it or leave it”  If you complain more you could end up in prison or even be killed.  Why is Leonard Peltier still in prison when George Zimmerman walks free?  The essence of exploitation and subjugation is rooted in the origin of the whole enterprise, and it keeps going. Fear of murder, rape, theft and torture lurk beneath the filmsy lable of “democracy”.

Those who benefit from this, as well as those who are afraid of exclusion and unsavory name calling desperately scream “you must vote”, “a vote for third parties is a vote for Trump”, “don’t be stupid”, “don’t be selfish” and so on.  Those words come out of people who screamed “black lives matter” yesterday, asking you to vote for the father of the crime bill.  Last year his running mate Kamala Harris managed to say that the Colin Kaepernick phenomenon was orchestrated by Russians.  I guess if they have to bomb countries full of brown people, it’s not very good to get rid of racism.  She knows her role in the empire very well.

By the way, they also claim that their political opponent, Trump, was placed in his position by Russians.  People should remember that the Democratic Party supported Trump as a pied piper candidate—meaning that he was so ridiculous that people would rather vote for their candidate Hilary Clinton.  But the manipulation went a little too far, enough so that Trump actually became the president.  I mean, Donald Trump, the loud-mouthed reality TV star with gilded gaudiness and shadiness actually became the President.  This has triggered the privileged class status quo tremendously.  They want their ways of colonizing, militarizing and corporatizing with class and righteousness, the way President Obama delivered it.  They want an agonized Black man doing his best, yet resulting in seven wars, big bank bailout, deportation, surveillance state, loss of legal rights, militarized police, drone killing and so on, instead of the embodiment of a loony Uncle Sam with lies, racism and violence asserting what the US government has always pursued.  Trump is the exact caricature of what the people of the world see: the US as the biggest bully with no taste. He is like fourth of July fireworks insisting on what the empire is entitled to.  “That’s not my president” people scream. Of course he is not.  That would trigger a huge cognitive dissonance. Their identity as freedom loving Americans of democracy falls apart. It’s this psychological projection mobilizing the sentiment of “resistance”.

Therefore, Trump turned out to be a godsend for the Democratic Party. He justifies the corrupt corporate political party of war, big bank bailout and neoliberal restructuring. I mean, as it’s already stated, the Party is an integral part of the American political institution which serves the rich and powerful along with their counterpart the Republican Party.  The Democratic Party doesn’t have legs to stand on without evil Trump.

That makes Joe Biden a pied piper candidate.  Why him?  I don’t endorse any imperial politics party candidate, but Sanders, for instance, proved himself to be able to beat Trump in 2016. Why not him? After all, the Democratic Party clearly stated that it is a private entity and it can pick anyone regardless of Primary or whatever. Biden is a hardened imperialist with a solid record of colonizing, militarizing and corporatizing.  And he is more widely known as a creepy old man who can’t keep his hands off of females, any female, especially very young ones. He has also shown some symptoms of going senile as well. Why him?  He is a pied piper candidate to keep the Democratic Party playing the role of savior against evil Trump.  You get two pied piper candidates.  This is what happens when capitalists continue to narrow political options in order to give the illusion of choice. The lies are so inflated that there is practically nothing left that can be reasonable.  And it doesn’t matter how the dice roles as long as everything stays within the imperial framework.  In fact, the more ridiculous, the more infuriating, and the more sensational, the better.  It can create the illusion of a “democracy” more vibrant and lively. But there are tremendous sacrifices.

Now people would ask “so what is your solution?”  I know that the question is rhetorical.  How can people who have willfully ignored everything being said about the insanity of supporting the imperial trajectory listen?   For those who turned into soldiers to keep their positions within the system, logic and reason become enemies in winning against anything that threatens their positions. This is, and has been, a war against people.  This is how the system of “democracy” deprives humanity from people and herds them into what they despise: fascism.  And my answer unfortunately is:  I don’t know.  I do respect and admire revolutionaries who have stood against the establishment.  When Fred Hampton was murdered by the US government, he was only 21.  His Black Panther Party with socialist principles inspired people across the country.  Patrice Lumumba stood for his people and showed the world beauty and strength of humanity.

We should all learn from experiences of revolutionaries and history of resistance against the capitalist domination, and see ourselves and our communities in such contexts.  And I do empathize with those who struggle with tremendous predicaments imposed by the oppressors.  But after all, I am merely an artist getting stuck in my studio, covered with paint and dust.  But I know one thing.  Years of working as an artist have taught me that a seemingly impossible problem can only be solved by a struggle, with honesty and patience.  What hurts me the most about participating in the corporate politics is that it kills our ability to reason and trust, therefore it deprives our ability to relate to others in truly meaningful ways.  It stands to reason that the dehumanizing symptom of capitalism—deprivation of our association to ourselves, communities, nature, and our future and our history—is most prominent in ways we determine our path as a collective.  It deprives our ability to dream together based on reality and our needs—dream about our future, dream about our children and dream about all the wonderful things in life.  And it brings tears to my eyes with sadness.  But I am certain that I am not alone.  I am speaking to you who are like me.  We are many.  And there will be more of us.

Lockdown Therapy for Capitalism

One might think that artists wouldn’t mind being isolated and having more time in studios on account of the current Coronavirus situation.  After all, we spend an enormous amount of time alone, and isolation allows us to have uninterrupted amounts of time to let our imaginations fly.

But there are other elements in play when we examine creativity.  For example, it is crucial that we feel safe to expose all our senses to our environment so that we ground our minds properly to our surroundings, harmoniously with all our channels open.

When the “lockdown” started I was at an art residency in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  I lived in a communal setting with twenty other artists and writers.  As soon as public spaces became inaccessible and “social distancing” became the norm at the residency, many of the fellow artists experienced lack of productivity.  I felt an immediate blockage to my making process.

Perhaps, since our society does not make artists’ activities a priority, this might be the last thing one would consider as a serious “problem”  And to a lesser extent such a concern might be secondary to many artists themselves who will be subjected to enormous economic difficulties.

It is “understood” that this is a “crisis” and we must “fight together“ against our “common enemy” which is the virus.

But who could blame those of us who are very much suspicious of such a momentum, as we hear “decrees” being issued to dictate our social activities while all instruments of state violence and repression are in place to regulate our behaviors.

After all we live in the same society which has baselessly demonized Muslims while bombing, colonizing and destroying their countries in the name of “war on terror”.  Young black people have been openly demonized to justify gentrification, mass incarceration, exploitation through substandard labor conditions and so on and so forth in the name of “war on drugs” and “tough on crime”.

We know that a “crisis” presents opportunities and tools for the ruling class to shape and perpetuate the social structure.  The system in which they thrive is always “too big to fail” while oppressed people keep failing so that they are safely cornered into hopelessness, cynicism and complacency to the feudal order of money and violence.

It is not a speculation that there are people who prosper and even benefit during an economic crisis—as smaller business owners struggle, large corporations and banks benefit from huge government subsidies, giving them more power to buy failing small businesses, for example.  And it is a fact that many of those people have enormous economic power to shape the policies that can benefit themselves. It is not a speculation that they would appreciate having strict measures of control against the people by limiting their freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and freedom to travel, or by installing means of surveillance, check points and official certifications for activities that might give freedom to the people beyond the capitalist framework.  It is not a speculation that they would benefit from moving our social interactions to the digital realm, which can commodify our activities as marketable data for the advertising industry, insurance industry and any other moneyed social institutions including education, political institution, legal institution, and financial institution.  Such matters should be seen within the context of the western history being shaped by unelected capitalists with their enormous networks of social institutions.  In fact, private foundations and NGOs are working with governmental organizations and global institutions to implement potentially dangerous policies of draconian measures as well as financialization of our activities for some time.  According to researchers—Cory MorningstarAlison McDowell and others, the potential impact of the transformation which is about to take place through the Internet, block chain technology, artificial intelligence, and etc. under the banner of the fourth industrial revolution can be devastatingly inhumane to our species’ path.  Examining those matters must not be subjected to being labeled as “conspiracy” and dismissed.

Needless to say, a draconian momentum against the capitalist hierarchy accelerates hardships of “invisible people” who struggle against economic deprivation and social repression.  How do homeless people “stay home”?  How do people in jail practice “social distancing”?   How are people vulnerable to domestic violence protected?   How do small business owners continue to stay in business?  How do poor people survive while public services and spaces are eliminated, while affluent people are stock piling in their generously equipped gated communities.  How do people with addiction stay sober?  How do people with suicidal tendencies  secure their dwindling connection to humanity?

But those discussions are rare among us.  A hint of doubt can trigger those people who are “fighting together”  Because once our creative minds learn to live safely in an authoritarian framework of draconian rules and decrees, the narrow framework restricts our thoughts and ideas.  Our minds get weaponized to uphold the authoritarianism as a path to “democracy”, “freedom”, “justice” and “humanity”, which have been mere euphemisms to describe blank checks given to the ruling class.  Once people turn into soldiers of the authoritarianism, the path to the ”solutions” is paved by their  relentless adherence to corporate political parties, official decrees and carefully concocted narratives within the capitalist framework.  Our discussions cease to be mutually respectful exchange; instead, they become battle grounds in which dissenting voices are vetted, attacked and eliminated.

A society that can’t sustain artists is a society that kills minds to care, understand, empathize and share.  A society that enforces its imperatives with fear instead of trust in humanity deprives a healthy mechanism to guide itself.

As I see how public sentiment is developing over the virus situation, I must mention one more thing.  There has been a proven method of silencing anti-capitalist voices within our society, used by media, political figures, corporate dissidents and others.  It requires a few steps.

First, amplify the voices of people who willingly sacrifice those who they consider to hold lower positions than they do in demanding their righteous positions within the capitalist hierarchy.  The voices might come from racist nationalists, patriarchal misogynists, flag waving anti-immigrant activists or heartless Trump supporters demanding old people to die during the coronavirus pandemic.  Those people recognize that an aspect or a policy of the establishment will compromise their lives—after all they are also oppressed by the capitalist order.  However, they do embrace the capitalist order in essence.  They do not tolerate sharing their positions with people who they despise.

Second, claim that you are with victims of racism, misogyny or xenophobia, or old people who are vulnerable during the coronavirus pandemic.

Third, falsely equate an anti-capitalist perspective with that of those political villains.

Fourth, dismiss those who are calling out the ruling class agenda as “racist”, “misogynists”, “fascist worshipers” and so on.

This method has been very effective.  I am sure that anyone who has expressed a concern over capitalist domination can recall being labeled as what they actually oppose.

The method achieves a few things at the same time.  First, it obscures the mechanism of capitalist hierarchy. Second, it divides people who should be fighting against the system together—obscuring the meaning of class struggle.  Third, it augments the capitalist hierarchy.  Fourth, it vitalizes the political legitimacy of corporate political parties which utilize the division.  Needless to say, the narrative of division is actively generated by corporate political parties as well.

It is imperative that we recognize the predicaments of the people who are most oppressed within our society, while we firmly recognize the dynamics within the capitalist hierarchy, and stay away from being a part of the mechanism which safely turns our predicaments into driving forces of capitalism.

I hope above writing can generate much needed discussions on the topic among us.

Feudal Japan’s Edo and the US Empire

After the warlord period of 15th century, Japan was united by a few families and then by a shogun family.  The period is called the Edo period. They disarmed civilians and established a mild caste system. The country was closed except for a few ports controlled by the central government, travel restrictions were put in place and certain technological developments were prohibited. The Edo period also had an interesting feature called sankinkoutai. It forced regional leaders to march across the country in formal costumes along with their armies in order to alternate their residences between their home regions and the capital of the feudal Japan, Edo.  It also forced leaders’ wives and family members to remain in Edo at all times. It was an elaborate system to keep the hierarchical structure intact.

The reign lasted a few centuries with no conflicts within the country until the US forced Japan to open in order to use its ports for the whaling business. I’ve been suspecting that the aim of some people among the ruling class circle is to establish such a closed hierarchical system which can function in a “sustainable” manner. But, of course, it is not exactly a system of equality and sharing as it would be advertised. The notion of “sustainable” is also very much questionable as we see blatant lies hidden behind carbon trade schemes, nuclear energy, “humanitarian” colonialism rampant in Africa and other areas, and so on.

Detail from a handscroll painting depicting the sankin kôtai procession of the lord of Iyo-Matsuyama han. Date unknown. National Museum of Japanese History

I mentioned the special feature, sankinkoutai, since I see an interesting parallel between it and “representative democracy” within the capitalist West today.  Of course, we don’t have such an obvious requirement among us, but similar dynamics occur within our capitalist framework. Our thoughts and activities are always subservient to the moneyed transactions guided by the economic networks. Our economic restrictions can force us to make decisions to do away with our needs—we might abandon our skills, interests, friendships, life styles, philosophies, ideologies, community obligations and so on. In fact, some of us are forced to live on streets, die of treatable illness, and suffer under heavy debt during our struggles. In a way, we surrender our basic needs as hostages to the system just as the Japanese regional leaders had to leave their family members under the watch of the Shogun family. Moreover, the more our thoughts differ from that of neoliberal capitalist framework, the more we must put our efforts into adjusting to it. Some of us might be labeled as “dissidents,” and such a label can create obstacles in our social activities. This functions similar to the fact that Japanese feudal regional leaders who were further away from the capital geographically had to put more efforts in marching across the country, requiring them to expend more resources. In the capitalist system, this occurs economically as well; those who are already oppressed by the economic strife must spend more resources to conform to the draconian measures to survive.

Now, one might wonder why regional leaders had subjected themselves to such an inhumane scheme. The march across the country was considered as a show of strength and authority; it was a proud moment to put on their costume to show off. The populations across the country were forced to respect this process with reverence and awe. There were strict regulations regarding how to treat such marches.

This situation can be compared to our political process: the presidential election in particular, in which our powers and interests are put in the corporate political framework to be shaped, tweaked, and distorted. Sanctioned by capitalist mandates and agendas, political candidates march across the nation while people proudly cheer their favorites. The more complicit with the capitalist framework the candidates are, the more lavish “the marches.” This forces the contents of political discourse to remain within the capitalist framework while marginalizing candidates and their supporters whose ideas are not obedient to it. “Representative democracy” within a capitalist framework can be one of the most powerful ways to install the values, beliefs and norms of the ruling class into minds of the people whose interests can be significantly curtailed by those ideas. All this can be achieved in the name of “democracy,” “free elections,” and so on.

Since people’s minds and their collective mode of operations are deeply indoctrinated to be a part of the capitalist structure, any crisis would strengthen the fundamental integrity of the structure. I heard a Trump supporter saying that “people should be shook up a little.” That’s actually a very appropriate description. When you shake their ground, people will try to hold onto whatever they think is a solid structure. Some of us might, however, try to hold onto a Marxist perspective, for example. That, of course, provokes reactions by those who go along with the capitalist framework because they will feel particularly threatened, sensing that their entire belief system might fall. Examination of facts and contexts during the time of crisis can generate divisions and opportunities to control and moderate opposing views.

Capitalist institutions are dominated by this mentality which might explain the extremely quick mobilization of the draconian restrictions and the demand for more restrictions during the time of “crisis”.  Economic incentives as well as self-preservation within the system force people to engage actively in unquestioning manner.  For example, we have observed concerted efforts in mobilizing media, government agencies, legal system and so on to “combat” “drug issues”, “inner-city violence” and so on which has led to mass incarceration, police killings and “gentrification” of primarily minority communities.  Needless to say, 9/11 has created enormous momentum of colonial wars against middle eastern countries.  No major media outlets or politicians questioned blatant lies surrounding WMD claim against Iraq, for example.  As a result, many countries were destroyed while one out of a hundred people on the planet became refugees.  Draconian regulations became normal, racism and xenophobia among people intensified and the term “global surveillance” became household.

This situation requires further examination since there are a few layers which must be identified.  First, we must recognize that there is an industry that commodifies “dissenting voices”.  The people who engage in this have no intention of examining the exploitive mechanism of capitalist hierarchy.  Some of them typically chose topics of government wrongdoings in contexts of fascist ideologies (jews are taking over the world, for example), space aliens and so on.  The angles are calibrated to keep serious inquiries away but they nonetheless garner major followings.  When certain topics fall into their hands, discussing them can become tediously unproductive as it prompts a label “conspiracy”.  It also contributes in herding dissidents toward fascist ideology while keeping them away from understanding actual social structure.

Second point is related to the first, when the topic enters the realm of “conspiracy”, and when we lose means to confirm facts, many of us experience cognitive dissonance.  The unspoken fear of the system becomes bigger than any of the topics at hand, and some of us shut down our thought process. As a result, we are left with hopelessness, cynicism and complacency.  This is a major tool of the system of extortion.  It makes some of us say “if there is a President who tries to overthrow capitalism, he or she will be assassinated”.  Such a statement illustrates the fact that understanding of violent system, fear and complacency can firmly exist in people’s minds without openly admitting to it.

Third, aside from the unspoken fear toward the destructive system, there is also unspoken recognition that the system is inherently unsustainable to itself and to its environment.  The cultish faith in capitalist framework is upheld by myths of white supremacy, American exceptionalism and most of all by our structural participation to it.   Any cult with an unsustainable trajectory eventually faces its doomsday phase.  It desires a demise of everything, which allows cultists to avoid facing the nature of the cult.  It allows them to fantasize a rebirth.  This in turn allows the system to utilize a catastrophic crisis as a spring board to shift its course while implementing draconian measures to prop itself up.  “The time of survival” normalizes the atrocity of structural violence in reinforcing the hierarchical order, while those with relative social privilege secretly rejoice the arrival of “the end”.

Any of those three dynamics can be actively utilized by those who are determined to manipulate and control the population.

Now, there is another interesting coincidence with the Japanese history.  The title Shogun had been a figurehead status given by the imperial family of Japan long before the Edo period.  Shogun is a short version of Seiitaishogun, which can be translated as Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Force Against the Barbarians. The title indicates the nature of the trajectory more bluntly than the US presidency which is also Commander in Chief — which has engaged in numerous colonial expeditions over the generations. But as I mentioned above, the Edo period was not a time of fighting “barbarians”. It was a time of a closed feudal system and its hierarchy was strictly controlled by its customs and regulations.  The current trajectory of our time prompts one to suspect the inevitable path to be a similar one.

Our thoughts and ideas have been already controlled by capitalist framework for generations.  We knowingly and unknowingly participate in this hostage taking extortion structure.  While shaken by crisis after crisis, we have gone through waves of changes, which have implemented rigid social restrictions against our ability to see through lies and rise above the feudal order of money and violence.

I do understand that the above discussion is very much generalized.  One can certainly argue against validity of the parallel based on historical facts and contexts.  Some might also argue the Edo period to be far more humane on some regards, in terms of how people related to their natural surroundings, or the system being actually sustainable, for instance.  But I believe that my main points still stand as valid and worthy of serious considerations.  Also, it is not my intention to label, demean and demonize policy makers of our time in cynical manner. My intention is to put the matter as a topic of discussion among those who are concerned in a constructive manner.  The comparison was used as a device for us to step back from our time and space in evaluating our species’ path today.

Lastly, as I describe the historical trajectory of the US empire, one can not not examine the nature of the current coronavirus panic “lockdown”. Although the incident is still very much developing some of us have already raised many questions.  This article is from a Chinese state media outlet repeating questions raised by some regarding the origin of the Coronavirus. The questions are serious ones which can easily topple entire official US narratives on the matter and beyond.

If the illness has originated from the US military facility as it has been concluded by some and the US has covered it up and blamed the illness on China, the US didn’t only expose its own citizens to the virus, but it knowingly caused deaths and sufferings among its own people. It erroneously blamed China for not acting fast enough against the situation, while adding the coronavirus deaths to the US annual flu deaths—which is always high due to its dysfunctional healthcare system. 

According to the allegations, some elected officials might have even profited from this murderous situation.

Subsequently, it stands to reason to question what has motivated the US to act in such a drastic manner against the virus after knowingly tolerating the deaths being caused by the virus for a few months.

Some points to keep in mind are:

1. A social crisis exacerbates structural violence against an already oppressed population leading to augmentation of ruling class interests.

2. A crisis allows bailout measures for those who are already being served generously by the system.

3. A crisis allows codification of draconian policies to further restrict an already oppressed population.

4. A crisis justifies the existence of the authoritarian system.

5. All of the above are various aspects of capitalist hierarchy to serve itself by harming its own people.

Please also refer to articles by Cory Morningstar on the topic.

When a crisis situation is identified in mobilizing the population, one common technique to contain dissenting voices is the use of false equivalency. For example, in discussing the US imperial war against Syria, one might have said that Russia was bombing just like the US.  However, needless to say, Russia was invited by the Syrian government to fight West-backed al-Qaeda affiliated terrorist groups in Syria.  The liberation efforts by the Syrian Arab Army and its allies brought back Syrian people to their own communities which were devastated by the US proxy war against Syria.

In the case of coronavirus situation, Chinese government detecting a disease epidemic so that it can allocate sufficient medical care to its people is very different from the US totally ignoring medical threats regularly and suddenly deciding to “care” in aimlessly draconian ways.

This Facebook post by Phil Greaves concisely lays out the difference:

“China:

-Lockdowns in only the most affected areas.
-Quarantine and hospital treatment for ALL suspected cases.
-Masks provided for everyone, no “two-meter” bullshit.
-200 million CPC members & volunteers mobilised to serve the elderly & vulnerable with food and medicine.
-ALL wages paid in full for anyone off work due to the virus, for the entire duration.

95% production regained after 4 weeks.

Britain:

-Nationwide house-arrest.
-Shuts down nearly the entire economy, sacks millions of workers, does not guarantee pay for even half of them.
-Gives the banks hundreds of billions.
-Massively reduces healthcare capacity.
-Allows supermarket chains to exploit panic buyers.

Economic depression inevitable.”

It is also very different for the Chinese government to regulate circulation of false information in order to implement its policies effectively from the US censoring legitimate questions about its ineffective policies and its active policies to harm its own people and “others”.

The differences in the approach of the two countries toward the peoples across the globe during this time of crisis are also very clear.  While China is reaching out to other countries to help their struggles — sending medical equipment and experts to those countries — the US is actively punishing some of the hardest hit countries with trade sanctions, trade embargo and demonization campaigns against them.

Corona panic incident is yet another milestone in clearly marking inhumanity of the imperial order perpetuated by the western hegemony.

In Defense of Cory Morningstar’s Manufacturing for Consent Series

Good investigative journalism doesn’t only reveal hidden mechanisms of our time;  it also exposes those who refuse to confront the mechanisms. Remember when the late Bruce Dixon courageously and cogently called Bernie Sanders “a sheep dog candidate”? Remember when Eva Bertlett, Vanessa Beeley and others truly stood with Syrian people in opposing the western intervention?  I do. Those who could not face the reality came up with all sorts of profanities and ill conceived theories to demonize the messengers.

Cory Morningstar has been a dedicated environmental activist with a sound track record, who has closely worked with various NGOs. She is a mother. She is an avid gardener. She is an honest person with empathy, passion, love for people, love for our fellow creatures and love for nature.  Her human character and sense of justice has culminated in her keen insights, observations and analyses.  Her writings have inspired many of us to see the depth and scope of capitalist institutions as part of the social dynamics affecting our consciousness.  Her meticulous pursuit of facts in illustrating mechanisms of our world evokes a sense of awe. She is a respected colleague in our struggle toward a better tomorrow.

While her latest series, “The Manufacturing of Greta Thunberg—for Consent:  The Political Economy of Non Profit Industrial Complex Volume I and Volume II”, has been wildly praised as a ground-breaking milestone in depicting the vast mechanism of exploitation and subjugation involving the Non-Profit Industrial Complex, it has been also maliciously misrepresented.

One of the very common, yet blatantly erroneous criticisms, centers around the series’s focus on the young activist. Why do they attack the author as a child abuser? The series does not attack the 16 year old activist at all. It points out those organizations and individuals which closely surround her in forming a momentum for their agenda. It delineates how the mobilization fits within the larger framework of corporate “environmentalism”, colonialism, global capitalism and imperialism.  The trickery of the accusation that the work attacks a child and smears the youth-led activism follows the same pattern of lies and deceptions unfolding against serious journalism for some time.  It reflects how establishment successfully dominates our minds as it dominates the hierarchy of money and violence.  The ruling class actually abuses children by making them pawns for lucrative business projects — such as carbon capture and storage, “renewable energy” schemes, carbon trading and so on (the series discusses why they do not work extensively). They trick the innocent youth into digging their own graves while making profits out of it.

Remember people called you racist, when you pointed out President Obama’s drone killings? Remember people called you misogynist when you criticized Secretary Clinton’s colonial policies? Those who did didn’t mind brown people blown into pieces, and didn’t mind the colonial oppression of women in colonized lands.  The capitalist hierarchy structurally forces us to embrace the values, norms and beliefs of the ruling class, as it trains people to climb the social ladder as expected.  The momentum to accuse Morningster’s work as a child abuse stems from the same psychological projection of accusers’ own complicity in consecrating a teenager as an invincible saint of their movement.

Then there is the most typical argument to condone obvious institutional tendencies of inhumanity: “things aren’t always black and white”.  Of course, there are good environmentalists doing good work as well.  We have gone through this in so many incarnations. When we point out police brutality, we hear “not all police officers are bad”. When we point out obvious racism among us:  “not all white people are racist”.  Those are certainly true.  But could we also say “not all slave masters were evil”, “not all Kings and queens were evil”, “not all colonizers were evil” and so on? Well, sure.  But does that mean we can bring back slavery, feudalism or colonialism?  No.

Refusal to talk about the systematic inhumanity inflicted by the system tolerates the status quo as acceptable. And please do stop with “but the movement gives us hope” nonsense.  What happened when we were sold “hope”, “change” and “forward”, and received colonial wars, big bank bailout, global surveillance and loss of legal protections during the Obama presidency?  We got Donald Trump.  When the system squeezes already oppressed people while shuttering their hope and making them embrace fear, people try their best to hold on to whatever they have.  They embrace an illusion of salvation in authoritarian lies and hatred against “others”. It is extremely important that we strive to discuss such a mechanism among us instead of jumping into the same momentum. We must discuss the true hope of building a momentum moving beyond the lies and deceptions coming out of the destructive hierarchy.

Morningstar states in “The Manufacturing of Greta Thunberg—for Consent:  The Political Economy of Non Profit Industrial Complex Volume II Act IV”:

Consider that collectively, the populace appears to believe that not only is it possible to colonize another planet, but that we will do so in the not-so-distant future. This is incredible considering the massive odds of and colossal barriers to such an endeavour succeeding. Thus, it is alarming, that this same populace appears not to believe it is not possible to create new societies where necessity is detached from want (superfluous consumer goods). This begs the question – have we been fully conditioned to believe only those that represent hegemonic interests? It is a sound question considering the billionaires of the world are currently petrified of the capitalist system collapsing – while those oppressed by the capitalist system believe it cannot be dismantled. Yet we can dismantle institutions. We can dismantle the capitalist economic system devouring what remains of the natural world – but not if we identify with our oppressors and the very system that enslaves us. It is our natural world and her living natural communities that sustain us. Not industrial civilization – not technology.

Hopelessness and cynicism do creep up to justify the status quo. But we also must recognize that such a position does away with putting our efforts toward standing with the truly oppressed ones.

Morningstar’s series meticulously documents how powerful global organizations seek ways to cultivate a consensus for their trajectory. And it carefully states, with facts, why the trajectory does not lead to achieving their promises — preventing climate change and other environmental calamities.  The illustrated mechanism has been revealed over and over through their past crimes—the coordinated actions of industries, bankers, politicians, NGOs, UN, global financial institutions and media have culminated into colonial wars, coverups of nuclear disasters, regime change, and other corporate, colonial and imperial policies. There is nothing speculative, coincidental or conspiratorial about the series. It is based on careful research, honesty, courage to face the real issue and true love for humanity. It is again curiously indicative that those who engage in a conspiracy to mobilize the people according to their agendas accuse those who see through the attempt as “conspiracy theorist”. The use of the derogatory term invented by the US intelligence agency to label dissidents as tin-hat wearing nuts jobs hardly proves their legitimacy.

Moreover, I must say that it is extremely odd and disingenuous that the series has been portrayed as a refusal to take any action, instead insisting on ideological purity. Such an attack has been coming out of those who have been pointing out the same moneyed network in forwarding corporatism, colonialism and militarism by manipulating popular opinions.  What is the difference between opposing destructive colonial wars and opposing colonization of nature/co-optation of activism?  More specifically, what prompts some of them to say “what is your solution?”, “we can’t wait for capitalism to be overthrown to solve climate change” and so on.

The obvious falsehood of such an angle is the stark absence of solutions within their own “green momentum”. Morningstar’s research does not talk about the necessity of establishing a communist statehood or overthrowing capitalism in order to solve the impending crisis.  It simply states facts in a cohesive manner. Consequently, it certainly indicates the systematic structural issues presented by the hierarchy of money and violence. The research clearly names individuals and organizations that are involved in mobilizing the population in installing government policies that are lucrative to the associated corporations and beneficial to the imperial framework. Capitalist hegemony does present itself as a source of predicaments of our time.  But is that new to us?

Needless to say, for those of us who believe in the Marxist perspective, the solution amounts to a structural transformation of our society into one that doesn’t monopolize the means of production for the ruling class. The economic activities must be subservient to harmonious existence of the people, environment and other species. And our social interactions must be under a control of such aims, instead of financial and social power of the ruling class. But make no mistake that that is simply an ultimate direction. Just as we voice our objections against any form of inhumanity regardless of our systematic problem, when we see certain environmental policies being subservient to the corporate agenda, likely to result in worsened conditions for the people, we discuss them.

There shouldn’t be anything different about pointing out the US military aggression and the fallacy of US environmental policies, especially when they are forwarded by the same western establishment.  When we find the carbon capture schemes to be disingenuous, for example, we simply point it out.  We demand an answer to why corporate “solutions” are upheld as people’s “solutions”. And people who buy into false narratives should be noted as not credible leaders in people’s movement. So the question “what is your solution?” really should be directed at those who subscribe to those erroneous “solutions.”  They need to be asked how those solutions would be a worthy cause at the first place, and why cogent criticisms against implementations of destructive schemes can not be embraced because “we can’t wait for a socialist revolution”.

What people desperately need today is good investigative reports like the one presented by Cory Morningstar, along with our educational efforts to reveal the mechanisms of our time.  We must learn how the unprecedented wealth accumulation among the very few ends up protected by layers and layers of moneyed social institutions coordinating to perpetuate the system, while progressively oppressive financial pressure and state violence against already oppressed people keep herding people into the capitalist framework. When we face the sad reality of people embracing policies that allow the powerful minorities to exploit and subjugate them over and over, what we need is not a popular mobilization guided by vague slogans easily subsumed by the imperial framework. Such a method would lead to draconian enforcement of corporate “solutions” according to their definition of “problems”. It is a recipe for bringing about a fascist order. What we need is openness and willingness to learn how we are domesticated by the authoritarian framework so that the actions are guided by the interests of the people in forming a society that allows true liberation of the people in a mutually respectful and harmonious manner.

Please do read “The Manufacturing of Greta Thunberg—for Consent: The Political Economy of Non Profit Industrial Complex” Volume I and Volume II. It gives us an excellent starting point in learning how to build a better tomorrow for all of us.

“Remember Pearl Harbor,” “Never Forget 9/11,” “Putin Did It”

“Remember Pearl Harbor” was the mantra used to enlist the US population in the imperial war in the Pacific.  When it became obvious that the interests of the Japanese empire collided with its own, the US triumphantly successfully baited the Japanese imperial force into military conflict by squeezing Japan with a trade embargo, war propaganda and military provocations.

There were many common threads between the Japanese empire and the US empire.  Both were vehemently anti-communist, colonial and militaristic. There just couldn’t be two capitalist empires in the Pacific. The immediate US actions after the war—the war which was supposed to fight off the imperial Japanese—clearly indicate that the US was there to dominate the Pacific:  the devastating Korean War to kill off communist forces, resulted in the deaths of 1/4 of the Korean population; US colonial policies against Pacific nations and beyond; and commencement of the Cold War with USSR and its allies.

The US nuked Japan to state who was the top dog in the Pacific and beyond.  After the war, the two empires became one.  The US establishment utilized willing Japanese war criminals in shaping the trajectory of post-WW2 Japan within the US imperial framework.  Today,  the phrase “remember Pearl Harbor” is used to keep the US Pacific ally under control, while justifying its imperial trajectory across the globe.

Now, such an angle also helps us see 9/11 from a fresh perspective.  All the unanswered questions surrounding the event, the use of the event to start a string of colonial wars against the Middle East, the use of the event to introduce draconian laws against the US population and so on delineate the nature of the imperial trajectory.

Most of us avoid talking about 9/11 without following the narratives provided by the establishment because the topic has been stigmatized as “conspiracy,” and it has become an industry independent from the historical context of colonial wars, capitalist expansion and loss of civil liberties.  However, it is clear that the world is suffering as a result of actions that followed the event—as 1 out of 100 people become refugees, while millions are killed by the US-backed colonial wars, which have destroyed many countries in the name of “democracy,” “freedom” and “justice.”

I bring up “remember Pearl Harbor” because recently I was told to remember it when I mentioned the dropping of nuclear bombs on the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  One would like to hope that nuclear incineration of a few hundred thousand innocent civilians would be condemned without any attempt for a justification. However, the US school system still teaches the children that the decision to massacre so many people was necessary to end the war.  Of course, such a position represents racism, American exceptionalism and colonial mentality, and it is successfully refuted by many reputable scholars and journalists as well as testimonies by US military officials at the time of the events.  By the time nuclear bombs were dropped, the Japanese government was seeking ways to end the war.  It was totally unnecessary for the stated purpose, however, it functioned as an unimaginably gruesome live human experiment, a threat against communist powers and collective punishment against any imperial competitor which gets in the way of the US empire building.  If you or your family members are not familiar with the accurate  version of the event,  I highly recommend reading works by Gar Alperovitz and others.

But I was not alive in 1941.  By the time I was born (1968), Japan was firmly in the hands of the US empire, violently repressing the segment of the Japanese population which stood against Japan’s complicity in the US militarism.  So can you see where those people stand when they tell you to “remember Pearl Harbor”?  It is the voice of the US empire chastising any element that goes outside of the imperial framework of colonialism, corporatism and militarism.

In the same way, I see people saying “remember 9/11”, “never forget 9/11” and so on.  But 9/11 regularly happens in Yemen today at the hands of the US led coalition.  Countless 9/11s have happened in Syria, which have killed 1/2 million Syrians, inflicted by the US-backed terrorists. Incidentally, those terror groups include associates of Al Qaeda, the original 9/11 attackers. The US establishment is breaking its law in giving material support to terror groups, turning its own military forces into an auxiliary of Al Qaeda forces.1,”2  And speaking of the origin, Osama Bin Laden was once a US-backed “freedom fighter” in Afghanistan. The US embarked on a deadly proxy war against socialist Afghanistan, and in the process, they created a justification for the the highly lucrative war on terror as well. In that sense, no matter where the truth lies, there is something to the claim that 9/11 was an inside job.  One can observe that the US capitalist hegemony is actively shaping the imperial hierarchy by any means necessary.

But there is much more.  There have been over 10,000 victims of many 9/11s inflicted by the US-backed Ukrainian coup government in the Russian-speaking eastern region of Ukraine. Those who are still parroting the US propaganda lies about Ukraine, or Crimea; please do watch Oliver Stone’s excellent documentary Ukraine On Fire. It meticulously describes how the CIA fomented Nazi forces in the region, which had become vital in the US backed coup against the democratically elected deposed government.  Furthermore, in 2017, details of protester killings—which were quickly blamed on the elected Ukraine government by the media—were revealed to be Georgian snipers.  In the testimonies, they claimed that they were ordered to shoot anyone to cause chaos at the scene. Shockingly, they also stated that they were under command of an American military officer. The US has been arming and training Ukraine military, continuing to add numbers of victims in Ukraine. Those people who have contracted the Putin panic, an epidemic spewing hatred against anything Russian, need to recognize the gravity of the matter. Our species has suffered deaths and destruction of imperial violence for some time.

Now, we have those same people in the west who have promoted the colonial savageries of murder and destruction against “others” telling us that Russians are destroying our “democracy”. For those who do not know the history, Russia was subjected to political and economic intervention by the US in the 90s. The US backed Boris Yeltsin—the US establishment openly bragged about him being their agent—even attacked his own parliament with tanks killing many officials.  Swarmed by the US neoliberal restructuring forces, the country’s socialist fabric was ripped apart to be sold away.  A prominent anti-imperial historian Luciana Bohne summarizes the era succinctly:

“The Neoliberal Great Terror,” known as economic “shock therapy.” Between 1992 and 2000, there were between five and six million “surplus deaths,” 170,000 people were murdered, the GDP fell by 50% (more than during German occupation in WW II), 70 million fell into poverty, death rates increased by 60%, like countries at war, life expectancy decreased in males to 57, abortions increased spectacularly, birth rates fell, suicides, tuberculosis, measles, diphtheria (eradicated in the 1930s) … In short (and this was supposed to be a short post) Russia, under “shock-therapy” “reforms” became the site of an economic genocide.”

It’s worth reading about what Luciana has to say about the century long US intervention against Russia.

Let’s put the dynamics in a perspective here regarding the “Evil Russian Empire.” Russia’s economy is about the size of South Korea. Its military spending is about 1/12 of the NATO forces. The US continues to encroach on Russia with hundreds of military bases. The US has been supporting right-wing coups around Russia despite its promise not to expand NATO forces. It continues to economically pressure Russia with embargoes. Russia is a geographically huge country with rich natural resources.  It is a strategic ally of the emerging economic giant China. What is the US doing here? The empire has been waiting for Russia to jump on its Pearl Harbor or a 9/11, isn’t it? But after seeing what the US hegemony does to a country like Russia, why would anyone bite the bate?

Then we’ve got this insane Putin panic epidemic, which is nothing more than a product of psychopathic delusional projection by the establishment that has been hacking, intervening, destroying, hijacking and stealing other countries’ political processes for generations.  Two years of allegations, accusations and speculations have not provided any proof of the Russian President stealing the election.  The same thing can be said about the 12 Russians indicted recently.3,4 The government’s own intelligence officer, former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, is warning the people that the alleged “Russian hacking” is unfounded while speculating that it is most likely the work of its own agency.

In any case, I am rather surprised that many people are buying such an obvious scheme of imperialism. What the US establishment is concocting is a classic momentum heading toward a war described eloquently by Smedley Butler in War is a Racket. It is a tactic of fascist manipulation described by Nazi war criminal Herman Goering:

the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to greater danger.

According to how history has unfolded what comes next are millions of horrible deaths and destruction.

We have been living in an empire that requires great sacrifices among the oppressed. There isn’t a future for such a scheme that stands on a pile of lies and deceptions. Every action to cover up a lie confirms the lie. The empire has been attempting to keep order by force. They’ve hired hitmen, many of them. But there is a time when the interests of the armed forces and the rich men collide in propping up the hierarchy. The late stage capitalism, as gruesome and atrocious as it is, isn’t entirely about protection racket, extortion, murder and theft. At some point, capitalists must fight among themselves for their own survival as its economic sphere suffers from its own violence and greed.  This is what we are facing today. We are looking at the empire disintegrating as its economic sphere is losing its power and legitimacy while “enemies” of the empire are gaining a sphere of influence. Corporate political parties, war industry, government agencies and the rest of the imperialists are struggling to assert their own interests within the imperial framework of corporatism, colonialism and militarism, while picking fights with Russia, China, Iran and any country that defies the imperial hegemony, desperately seeking ways to matastasize for their survival. But the entire imperial order is collapsing.

We must not be a voice for the capitalist lords nor for the hitmen.  This is a time we must reach out to people like us in Russia, China, Syria, Iran, and other peoples of the planet, and people like us in our communities, with messages of peace, sharing and mutual respect. The corporate power is already embarking on colonizing the momentum (see the work done by the Wrong Kind of Green on the non-profit industrial complex, for instance).  We the people of the planet somehow must assert our desire to bring about a new era for our species beyond the sufferings and deaths of neo-feudalism.  You might feel isolated.  But we are everywhere on this planet. We want to live as brothers and sisters.  We want to live in harmony with our planet.  We share our angles and facts for a better tomorrow for our children and their children.  This is an urgent challenge of our time.  Peace to us all.

  1. The De Facto US/Al Qaeda Alliance,” by Robert Parry.
  2. Syria – U.S. Moves To Protect Al-Qaeda And ISIS in Daraa,” by Moon of Alabama.
  3. Clinging to Collusion: Why Evidence Will Probably Never Be Produced in the Indictments of ‘Russian Agents’,” by Joe Lauria.
  4. No Evidence In Mueller’s Indictment Of 12 Russians – Release Now May Sabotage Upcoming Summit,” by Moon of Alabama.

1500 Rakan Statues of Mount Nokogiri

People sometimes ask me what religion Japanese people practice.  I usually end up saying that Japanese people aren’t very religious at all.  But paradoxically, if you go to Japan, you encounter huge shrines at tourists’ spots and there are numerous smaller ones across the country in many forms.  You visit a Japanese household, you might also find a shrine, a box shaped prayer spot, called butsudan.

There certainly are indications that Japanese society is bound together, to a certain extent, with beliefs, values and norms deriving from variations of Buddhism and Shintoism.

To me, who grew up in Japan, it is natural to perceive such a traditional framework as a cohesive layer that can be loosely described as sort of “religious”.  It guides traditional ceremonies and rituals of life, death and spiritual, and it contributes to world views of the Japanese people in varying degrees.

However, it should also be noted that this framework really does not address fundamental existential questions for the Japanese people today. In other words, people would go along with the customary rituals as long as they facilitate their social interactions and obligations; however, as soon as they impede their material necessity, they can be set aside. Japanese society is extremely secular and the grip of the socioeconomic hierarchy over its people is very firm.  After all, Japan has played a crucial role as an economic power in the western hegemony for generations after it was incorporated into the order of the American empire.

Our trip to Mount Nokogiri, however, has shown me how the abstract notion of traditional Japan has many layers that are deeply conflicting and it has had tumultuous aspects as we examine it in historical contexts.

Mount Nokogiri is located in Boso Peninsula, Chiba.  As you can see on a map it is relatively close to Tokyo.  My wife and I visited the area once before we had our kids.  I loved seeing rakan statues (stone carved arhat statues) along the path during our hike.  To me they appeared as expressions of lives emanating from the area which had been regarded as sacred for many centuries.

This time, we decided to stay for a couple of nights at a nearby seaside city, Tateyama. The inn we picked had a nice view of the water and hot spring baths.  Since my mother couldn’t take the mountain hike, I wanted her stay to be nice as well.  It was a few rustic train stops away to Mount Nokogiri.

I really liked riding the rural trains in the area.  Going a few hours south from Yachiyo city into the Peninsula made the scenery much greener and it was fascinating to observe a glimpse of country life as we passed fields cultivated with various crops, a house sitting among trees without a discernible way to get there, huge hawks flying over us and the water visibly getting cleaner as we got closer to our destination.

The hike was magnificently wonderful.  It was a bit strenuous for me, with numerous steps. But I’ve never felt a physical exercise to be so refreshing, so invigorating and so satisfying (in fact, it inspired me to start exercising again when I came back to the States).

My son found a Tamamushi (jewel beetle).

 

Nokogiri means saw blade.  The jagged appearance of the mountain stems from its history being a prominent stone quarry.

 

30 meter tall stone carved Buddhist goddess.

 

A Stone observatory called “Hell Peek” sticks out into the air. Terrifying!

 

Mount Nokogiri is also a home for the largest stone carved Buddha in Japan (31 meter tall).

I took many pictures of the small statues as we walked.  If you look at the statues carefully, you will notice that the necks of them have traces of reattachment.  Those statues were all violently destroyed once during the haibutsukishaku movement.  As the rule of the Tokugawa shogun family ended in 1868, the new government, aspiring to be one of the imperial powers of the time, embarked on drastic reforms.  One of them was a separation of Buddhism and Shintoism.  Shintoism was elevated as a national religion while Buddhism was regarded as a part of the old power. There was a strong momentum to see the power of Buddhist entities as an abusive and corrupt part of the past.  The accounts from the time certainly indicate that the deeds of the Buddhist class did reflect such descriptions.  The result was an emergence of a large scale destructive movement across the country against anything Buddhist.  As to Shintoism, it eventually ended up as the backbone of imperial Japan, propping up the Japanese emperor as a living god, prompting a direct collision with the US imperial plan over the hegemonic rule of Asia.  The inhumane momentum of destruction and atrocity took many lives in Asian countries.  In the name of the living god the Japanese colonizers sent young lives as suicide bombers.  The colonizers of the US dropped nuclear bombs on two cities full of people in order to declare its hegemonic superiority against enemies and allies alike.

Today the Buddihist legacy in the Mount Nokogiri area is regarded as a significant cultural asset.  The beautiful trails are well maintained, so are the shrines and statues for many visitors.  It was breathtaking to encounter spectacular views throughout our walk.  The weight of the historical layers also compounded the profound orchestration of the natural elements. The moss covered expressions of the aged statues — sad, tormented, resigned, angered, struggling, peaceful and fulfilled — were voices from the past beautifully sublimated within the harmony of nature and people.

As we were waiting for our bus back home, a man at a tiny local restaurant insisted that we take a look at an underground imperial Japanese fortress in Tateyama.  Although we couldn’t extend our trip for it, according to him, a mile-long tunnel dug during WW2  is something you must not miss if you were in the area.  He also mentioned that the entire Mount Nokogiri was a huge military fortress during the war.  To the imperial Japan, the area, situated at the entrance to Tokyo Bay, was the last defense on the ground protecting Tokyo against the invading US forces.

Famed sculptor Isamu Noguchi said that time can heal stones in describing his stone carving process.  Time can certainly give us a thrust of objectivity while natural elements can provide a layer of harmony, presenting a new way to understand what unfolds before us.  Mount Nokogiri certainly stood as a sacred ground before me.  The overwhelming sense of awe generously erased the scars of human atrocity.

However, it has also made me aware of myself as a captive of our time.  Tateyama’s imperial Japanese base is now a base for the Japanese self-defense force.  The corporate media is eerily silent about the fortification of islands around Okinawa, which lies at the tip of the archipelago and houses an American military base. Japanese regulations have been changed to allow a Japanese “self-defense force,” ostensibly to operate as a part of the western force against China. Those shifts coincide with the US pacific policy to counter China as an emerging economic power. And more urgently, I couldn’t help being reminded of inhumane atrocities of our time–bombing campaign against people, suicide bombing, underground fortress, destruction of environment and cultural heritage and so on and so forth are all elements emerging from the western colonial wars being waged against the Middle East and elsewhere today.

Have we learned anything from the past?  Our ability to see our history and events embedded in it, weaving the flow of time and space, as a unified front, as a collective part of our identity, allow us to tolerate pains of atrocity, allow us to reconcile, allow us to rebuild and allow us to be.  But we do know that the significant portions of the sufferings and deaths are endured by those who are powerless.  How could we allow ourselves to let the momentum of time swallow so many of our fellow humans?  Why are we tolerating colonial destabilization of “other people’s”?  How could we close our eyes as we encounter people sleeping on streets or losing their lives because they can’t afford to be healthy?  Why can’t we focus our hope for renewal for the people who have and will suffer the most?  How could we recognize the fact that our willingness to tolerate the hierarchy of money and violence, as the shape of our species, inflicts pain against “others” and against ourselves at the same time, forcing ourselves to expect nuclear missile attacks instead of reaching out for sharing and peace?

Every time I hear people say that for things to get better, things have to get much worse, I think of what happened in Fukushima.  Three nuclear meltdowns have not woken up the people.  The nuclear industrial complex of Japan is firmly embedded within the war economy of the empire.

This is not the time for conflict. This is the time we need each other to see what has become of us.  Let there be braveness, determination and steadfastness in renouncing the cannibalistic momentum of self-destruction.  The sacred power of nature will always embrace us no matter how we will do.

The Eyes of “Others” for Us All

Photo by Fibonacci Blue | CC BY 2.0

For every immigrant, speaking about his or her home country can be somewhat emotional and personal.  For us immigrants,  the experiences of leaving former identities framed in memories of the land, people, smells, tastes, smiles, laughter, tears and other feelings wrapped in the native tongues and rebuilding our own personhoods in foreign words, foreign-scapes, foreign frameworks held together with the values, beliefs and norms of others gives us a special opportunity to see our world dimensionally.  Some of us recognize the mechanisms carefully hidden by the very machination of the social structure.  The revelation, at the same time, reveals our essential beings hidden in our former-selves.

When I came to the states as a 18-year-old young man, I found out that I was a little Asian man.  I met enough people in the small town in West Virginia who didn’t bother to hide their feelings when they recognized me as “other”.  Although, I must say that there were also plenty of people who expressed generosity and friendliness to me.  In addition, after all, I was one of the privileged Asians–a Japanese.

Japan was nuked twice after the humiliating defeat over the imperial struggle for the Asian hegemony (China and associated interests, etc.) (1)  Uncle Sam showed off who the top dog was by incinerating two cities worth of people in Japan.  The country was at the brink of extinction.  But, Japan, after all, was the most prominent capitalist force in Asia.  I think the US made a calculated decision to co-opt the Japanese imperial momentum as its Asian proxy in the most effective way–this, by the way, mirrors what happened to Germany and its Nazi elements as well (2).  After the war, the new US backed Japanese regime was given a partnership role in the hegemonic rule of the Pacific nations by the US.  The one and only viable political party in Japan, the Liberal Democratic Party, got CIA support along with the Imperial Japanese war criminal leaders  guiding its trajectory (3)(4).  This was–for the US, as well as for the Japanese corporate power–certainly a better option than Japan having a communist revolution of some sort.  The US backed Japanese regime totally went along with the US occupational force, and it did extensive work in demonizing the Japanese imperial trajectory of the past (it must have been easy considering the horrendous things they had done to the neighboring countries) while replacing the momentum with the US made “democracy”, “freedom”, “justice” and so on, which of course operate within the framework of corporatism, colonialism and militarism.  The process came with demonization of socialist elements, infiltration of socialist elements, and neutralization of socialist elements.  As a result, Japan became a formidable capitalist force backed by the US military might against China and Soviet Union (Russia).

This explains the odd subserviency exhibited by the Japanese here and there.  My British friend in Japan, for example, was deeply puzzled by people in Hiroshima welcoming Obama’s visit.  However, for the Japanese, Obama is a leader of the “free world”.  The fact that he was there to whitewash his engagement in expansion of the US nuclear arsenal, global warmongering and so on and so forth was not a problem to most Japanese people.  This tendency can be prominent even among those who vehemently oppose the Japanese rightwing establishment that shamelessly glorifies the imperial Japanese past.  Just as president Obama’s kill list and violent colonialism against Libya, Syria and so on didn’t register as criminal to many people in the US.  In fact the situation sort of parallels Democratic Party members vehemently demonizing the current Republican president for following colonial, corporate and military initiatives begun by the previous Democratic Party administration.

But in any case, for many who see the enormity of the military might possessed by the US, the monstrosity is a necessary evil against the “bad guys” in the world theater.  For many who do oppose the war machine, so called US allies are seen as independent countries with their own self-determination, fully capable of making decisions.  Therefore, some of us end up wondering why people in Japan or Germany faithfully go along with the US imperial policies even if that might be contrary to their own interests:  Like, going along with sanctions against Russia when they might be losing a productive economic relationship with Russia, or provoking Russia or North Korea even if their own counties might be targets of nuclear attacks.  Meanwhile, going along with imperial policies  is getting more and more debatable: the imperial hegemony seems to be imploding as it desperately attempts to grow, while China enjoys its spectacular economic success in pursuing a Marxist trajectory in its own way.

There is an interesting anecdote revealing the true nature of the imperial relationship between Japan and the US.  When three of the Fukushima nuclear plants caused China syndrome in March 2011, Naoto Kan, the Prime Minister at the time, warned other Japanese officials that the US might occupy Japan.  The remark allowed some to label him as a clueless moron.  However, some of us saw in the remark the real position of Japan within the imperial hierarchy shaped by money and violence  in which a “sovereign” country exercises its “free will” at imperial economic and military gun point.

The steep imperial hierarchy that imposes the US military bases in Okinawa (for example), which has been dumping agent orange, depleted uranium, and toxic materials (5) while turning pristine rainforest into a jungle warfare training ground, a military aircraft airport, and a shooting range while also creating the grave threat of nuclear war against South Korea, Japan, Europe and so on, extends right onto the US soil as well. The very population that have allowed the empire to grow so much endure mass incarceration, police violence, massive unemployment, blatant lack of social safety nets, poverty, health crisis, education crisis and so on. But the imperial mind trick somehow renders their powerlessness less visible than the powerlessness of the Japanese people or the German people perhaps.  An extraordinary case that illustrates my point deals with the USS Reagan aircraft carrier, which was heavily irradiated by radiation plume from the Fukushima disaster.  The sailors suffering from radiation diseases have been abandoned by the US government as well as the Japanese government (6).  Within the imperial hierarchy, common men and women are powerless and disposable regardless of their nationalities.

If the current build up of the US economic/military pressure against Pacific countries continues, and if Japan keeps serving its role with re-militerization, the relationship between the US and Japan can more prominently exhibit a neo-colonial relationship.  In this scenario, Japan would play an armed guard dog of the empire against China, Russia and so on, while giving an impression that the violence that emerges should be blamed solely on the evil Japanese regime that would surely come to the fore. This gives the US an opportunity to act as the good cop who engages in whatever is necessary to bring about a “peace”–a “peace” under the western capitalist hegemony.  Japan can be Asia’s Israel.  And Asia can be the Middle East 2.0.

Regardless, militarization will prolong the life of the western war economy while continuing to delegitimize its authority.  The illegitimate force will need a bit more iron fist to keep the whole thing in line.  The death spiral that devours the capitalist hegemony will exacerbate the hardship of the people in the west while continuing to mess with the rest of the world.

Maybe I’m letting my imagination fly too wild.  But as I said, I felt the imperial arrogance of Japan within the framework of western imperialism as I went through the process of perceiving my existence within the larger framework of the global hierarchy.  I do not like the dynamics at all.  I want the people of Asia stop being a part of the imperial hierarchy. I want the people of Asia to work together to create environment to free their potential in living harmoniously with each other and with the environment.

Every struggle of a people is connected to struggles of others, and each struggle is unique according to their predicaments.  For that reason, we must not keep our eyes off of the larger framework of global capitalism and its contradictions.  We must not impose the imperial framework onto people of other countries.

I do know that it is much easier to say than to live according to such a perspective.  When I see my fellow Asian people or any immigrant bending so far backward to kiss a nefarious backside of the establishment, I feel their urgent need to be accepted in the hierarchy of money and violence.

But still, I desperately feel the need to share what I learned through the eyes of an immigrant.  The emotional and personal part of my story also stems from the fact that I could not adjust to the highly structured Japanese atmosphere when I was growing up.  I particularly remember the regular corporal punishments I received at school.  I developed an extreme aversion toward the authoritative tendency.  The process of shedding my former-self slowly taught me how foreign elements can be removed and destroyed within an authoritative hierarchy by imposing obedience or self-destruction.  As a young man I chose self-destruction by alcoholism.  This continued until I found my expression in art.  My studio practice also led me to understand the bits and pieces holding together to show me the larger picture of what I went though as I moved to a different society.  Without this experience, I might have followed a different path.

Anyone in the imperial hierarchy can become “other”.  I believe our experience as “others” might perhaps inform the true nature of the capitalist hierarchy for those who have a hard time seeing it.  After all we are but one species struggling to save ourselves from our collective predicament of the threat of extinction.

Notes.

(1) The War Was Won Before Hiroshima—And the Generals Who Dropped the Bomb Knew It Seventy years after the bombing, will Americans face the brutal truth?

(2) In Cold War, U.S. Spy Agencies Used 1,000 Nazis

(3) Nobusuke Kishi

(4) C.I.A. Spent Millions to Support Japanese Right in 50’s and 60’s

(5) Okinawa: the junk heap of the Pacific Decades of Pentagon pollution poison service members, residents and future plans for the island

(6) Injustice At Sea: the Irradiated Sailors of the USS Reagan

The Eyes of “Others” for Us All

For every immigrant, speaking about his or her home country can be somewhat emotional and personal. For us immigrants,  the experiences of leaving former identities framed in memories of the land, people, smells, tastes, smiles, laughter, tears and other feelings wrapped in the native tongues and rebuilding our own personhoods in foreign words, foreign-scapes, foreign frameworks held together with the values, beliefs and norms of others gives us a special opportunity to see our world dimensionally.  Some of us recognize the mechanisms carefully hidden by the very machination of the social structure.  The revelation, at the same time, reveals our essential beings hidden in our former-selves.

When I came to the states as a 18 year old young man, I found out that I was a little Asian man.  I met enough people in the small town in West Virginia who didn’t bother to hide their feelings when they recognized me as “other”.  Although, I must say that there were also plenty of people who expressed generosity and friendliness to me. In addition, after all, I was one of the privileged Asians–a Japanese.

Japan was nuked twice after the humiliating defeat over the imperial struggle for the Asian hegemony (China and associated interests, etc.) Uncle Sam showed off who the top dog was by incinerating two cities worth of people in Japan. The country was at the brink of extinction. But, Japan, after all, was the most prominent capitalist force in Asia. I think the US made a calculated decision to co-opt the Japanese imperial momentum as its Asian proxy in the most effective way–this, by the way, mirrors what happened to Germany and its Nazi elements as well. After the war, the new US backed Japanese regime was given a partnership role in the hegemonic rule of the Pacific nations by the US.

The one and only viable political party in Japan, the Liberal Democratic Party, got CIA support along with the Imperial Japanese war criminal leaders guiding its trajectory. This was–for the US, as well as for the Japanese corporate power–certainly a better option than Japan having a communist revolution of some sort. The US backed Japanese regime totally went along with the US occupational force, and it did extensive work in demonizing the Japanese imperial trajectory of the past (it must have been easy considering the horrendous things they had done to the neighboring countries) while replacing the momentum with the US made “democracy”, “freedom”, “justice” and so on, which of course operate within the framework of corporatism, colonialism and militarism. The process came with demonization of socialist elements, infiltration of socialist elements, and neutralization of socialist elements.  As a result, Japan became a formidable capitalist force backed by the US military might against China and Soviet Union (Russia).

This explains the odd subservience exhibited by the Japanese here and there. My British friend in Japan, for example, was deeply puzzled by people in Hiroshima welcoming Obama’s visit. However, for the Japanese, Obama is a leader of the “free world”. The fact that he was there to whitewash his engagement in expansion of the US nuclear arsenal, global warmongering and so on and so forth was not a problem to most Japanese people. This tendency can be prominent even among those who vehemently oppose the Japanese right-wing establishment that shamelessly glorifies the imperial Japanese past.

Just as president Obama’s kill list and violent colonialism against Libya, Syria and so on didn’t register as criminal to many people in the US. In fact the situation sort of parallels Democratic Party members vehemently demonizing the current Republican president for following colonial, corporate and military initiatives begun by the previous Democratic Party administration.

But in any case, for many who see the enormity of the military might possessed by the US, the monstrosity is a necessary evil against the “bad guys” in the world theater. For many who do oppose the war machine, so called US allies are seen as independent countries with their own self-determination, fully capable of making decisions. Therefore, some of us end up wondering why people in Japan or Germany faithfully go along with the US imperial policies even if that might be contrary to their own interests: Like, going along with sanctions against Russia when they might be losing a productive economic relationship with Russia, or provoking Russia or North Korea even if their own counties might be targets of nuclear attacks. Meanwhile, going along with imperial policies  is getting more and more debatable: the imperial hegemony seems to be imploding as it desperately attempts to grow, while China enjoys its spectacular economic success in pursuing a Marxist trajectory in its own way.

There is an interesting anecdote revealing the true nature of the imperial relationship between Japan and the US. When three of the Fukushima nuclear plants caused China syndrome in March 2011, Naoto Kan, the Prime Minister at the time, warned other Japanese officials that the US might occupy Japan.

The remark allowed some to label him as a clueless moron. However, some of us saw in the remark the real position of Japan within the imperial hierarchy shaped by money and violence in which a “sovereign” country exercises its “free will” at imperial economic and military gun point.

The steep imperial hierarchy that imposes the US military bases in Okinawa (for example), which has been dumping agent orange, depleted uranium, and toxic materials while turning pristine rainforest into a jungle warfare training ground, a military aircraft airport, and a shooting range while also creating the grave threat of nuclear war against South Korea, Japan, Europe and so on, extends right onto the US soil as well. The very population that allowed the empire to grow so much endures mass incarceration, police violence, massive unemployment, a blatant lack of social safety nets, poverty, a health crisis, an education crisis, and so on. But the imperial-mind trick somehow renders their powerlessness less visible than the powerlessness of the Japanese people or the German people perhaps.

An extraordinary case that illustrates my point deals with the USS Reagan aircraft carrier, which was heavily irradiated by radiation plume from the Fukushima disaster. The sailors suffering from radiation diseases have been abandoned by the US government as well as the Japanese government. Within the imperial hierarchy, common men and women are powerless and disposable regardless of their nationalities.

If the current build up of the US economic/military pressure against pacific countries continues, and if Japan keeps serving its role with re-militerization, the relationship between the US and Japan can more prominently exhibit a neo-colonial relationship. In this scenario, Japan would play an armed guard dog of the empire against China, Russia, and so on, while giving an impression that the violence that emerges should be blamed solely on the evil Japanese regime that would surely come to the fore. This gives the US an opportunity to act as the good cop who engages in whatever is necessary to bring about a “peace”–a “peace” under the western capitalist hegemony. Japan can be Asia’s Israel. And Asia can be the Middle East 2.0.

Regardless, militarization will prolong the life of the western war economy while continuing to delegitimize its authority. The illegitimate force will need a bit more iron fist to keep the whole thing in line. The death spiral that devours the capitalist hegemony will exacerbate the hardship of the people in the west while continuing to mess with the rest of the world.

Maybe I’m letting my imagination fly too wild. But as I said, I felt the imperial arrogance of Japan within the framework of western imperialism as I went through the process of perceiving my existence within the larger framework of the global hierarchy. I do not like the dynamics at all. I want the people of Asia stop being a part of the imperial hierarchy. I want the people of Asia to work together to create environment to free their potential in living harmoniously with each other and with the environment.

Every struggle of a people is connected to struggles of others, and each struggle is unique according to their predicaments. For that reason, we must not keep our eyes off of the larger framework of global capitalism and its contradictions. We must not impose the imperial framework onto people of other countries.

I do know that it is much easier to say than to live according to such a perspective. When I see my fellow Asian people or any immigrant bending so far backward to kiss a nefarious backside of the establishment, I feel their urgent need to be accepted in the hierarchy of money and violence.

But still, I desperately feel the need to share what I learned through the eyes of an immigrant. The emotional and personal part of my story also stems from the fact that I could not adjust to the highly structured Japanese atmosphere when I was growing up. I particularly remember the regular corporal punishments I received at school. I developed an extreme aversion toward the authoritative tendency. The process of shedding my former self slowly taught me how foreign elements can be removed and destroyed within an authoritative hierarchy by imposing obedience or self-destruction. As a young man I chose self-destruction by alcoholism. This continued until I found my expression in art. My studio practice also led me to understand the bits and pieces holding together to show me the larger picture of what I went though as I moved to a different society. Without this experience, I might have followed a different path.

Anyone in the imperial hierarchy can become “other”. I believe our experience as “others” might perhaps inform the true nature of the capitalist hierarchy for those who have a hard time seeing it. After all we are but one species struggling to save ourselves from our collective predicament of the threat of extinction.

Peace and Love, Beyond the Neo-Feudal Order

Oh “democracy”, an iron fist of tomahawk missiles ripping through flesh and bone .  Oh “freedom”, 1/2 million ascending souls of Iraqi children delivering wealth to the powerful few.  Oh “justice”, a magic wand of fear and death reigning over the wasting hierarchy of money and violence.

Within the framework of imperialism, all of us, regardless of religion, race, gender or ethnicity, are given the divine right to worship power and money. Anyone who frowns upon such an imperial right can be labeled as “racist”, “misogynist”, or “fascist”.  Speaking against the drone war normalized by President Obama might earn you a label “racist”.  Speaking against Hilary Clinton’s wars and corporatism could turn you into a “misogynist”.  Opposing colonial aggression pushed by the two corporate political parties can make you a part of “axis of evil”.  The framework that justifies colonialism, corporatism and militarism in the name of “democracy”, “freedom” and “justice” turns the the population into accomplices of the unimaginable atrocities and inhumanity.

Anyone who attempts to point out the plight of the oppressed due to their religion, race, gender, class or ethnicity can be labeled as “divisive”, “racist”, “sexist” or “fascist”.  The neo-feudal hierarchy must be detached from material reality and remain as an invisible caste order for the system to perpetuate itself by inflicting structural violence in continuing to accumulate power and resources.

That way, such words as “imperialism”, “class”, “capitalism”, “socialism”, “marxism” can be safely handled by the imperialists without causing actual damage to the chilling steepness of the imperial hierarchy, just as such terms as “democracy”, “freedom” and “justice” are freely used by the imperialists to herd the subjects into the framework of  corporatism, colonialism and militarism.

The blunt psychic trauma paralyzes our will and courage as the corporate media machine, academics who sold their principles to the imperial order, corporate agents disguised as elected officials and the rest of the moneyed institutions dismember facts, history, knowledge, communities and our ties to nature, unharnessing our emotions from the material reality that feeds us, harbors us and harmonizes our beings with the planet.  Meanwhile, fear and projection of criminal souls flood the atmosphere with lies and deceptions firmly harnessing our emotions onto schemes of self-inflicted pain, sectarian disputes and unconditional obedience to the ruthless masters of death and suffering.

Ruthlessness.  Why so ruthless?  In describing the imperial trajectory of our time a prominent scholar Lusiana Bohne discusses and quotes George Kennan:

George Kennan, former ambassador to Moscow (1930s) and architect of Cold War’s policy of “containment” (of communism) recommends inequality of international relations in 1948. That’s class war against the world’s nations.

By “we,” George Kennan does not mean the 99% of Americans. He means the 1% of them.

“We have about 50% of the world’s wealth but only 6.3% of its population. This disparity is particularly great as between ourselves and the peoples of Asia. In this situation, we cannot fail to be the object of envy and resentment. Our real task in the coming period is to devise a pattern of relationships which will permit us to maintain this position of disparity without positive detriment to our national security. To do so, we will have to dispense with all sentimentality and daydreaming; and our attention will have to be concentrated everywhere on our immediate national objectives. We need not deceive ourselves that we can afford today the luxury of altruism and world benefaction.”

— Memo by George Kennan, Head of the US State Department Policy Planning Staff. Written February 28, 1948, Declassified June 17, 1974″ (1)

A series of reckless policies, colonial violence and schemes of manipulation have been perpetrated in the process of protecting the order described above.  Among many events instigated, one of the emblematic ones was the assassination of John F Kennedy. It needs to be clearly recognized that the hegemonic power that assassinated President Kennedy did so to insist on the trajectory of wealth/power accumulation within the neo-feudal hierarchy of capitalism.  The US establishment continues to use the nefarious event to make a point that it can do whatever it wishes.

For example, the recent partial disclosure of documents relating to the assassination has indicated that the US government planed to bomb Miami and blame it on Castro (2).  What’s evil about the obvious attack against the people as well as against humanity itself is not only that the plan itself was horrendously unacceptable. There is also the fact that the government is disclosing such a plan for all to see in order to put fear into the enemies as well as into the American people and the rest of the populations in the western hegemony, clearly manifesting its intention to govern with a bloody iron fist of murders and destruction.  The admission comes with blatant  censorships to hide any information leading to any accountability and prosecution of existing organizations or individuals. This guarantees that the government can do anything with impunity.  And this of course corresponds to any other instances in which government agencies are said to be involved in horrendous calamities while absolutely lacking on the disclosed details of the involvement.  This sort of fear based governance is so deeply embraced by the minds of many that political discussions often result in such helpless conclusions by the unsuspecting subjects; “if anyone tries to do anything like that, he or she will be assassinated”.

Meanwhile impossible standards of the highest order are required for the very existence of nations that defy the western economic hegemony:  absolute cleanliness, absolute openness, absolute non-violence and absolute adherence to the framework of the western market economy is required by them.  The imperial attacks against them vary from smear campaigns with fabricated stories, demonization of leaders with allegations of crimes that are regularly committed by western leaders, support for violent extremists, instigation of proxy wars, deadly economic sanction, financial blockade, military intervention and so on and on (3).

Dismembered bodies and dislocated people are carefully hidden from our view unless the shock of inhumanity is needed to mobilize a domestic momentum of “democracy” to justify colonial atrocities.  Crying babies, dying elderlies, deaths, sufferings and pains, the urgent signals rushing through our nerves which have guided us in building families, friendships and communities are harvested to drive the war machine.  Our hearts, minds, brains, beliefs, values and norms have been colonized by the force that has built the enormous neo-feudal world of money and violence. That is what they have done to enforce the disparity among us, which really is an invisible global caste order.

Those of us who see through the path of our species must ask the obvious question;  why don’t all nations stand on the same ground in protecting the ways of peoples of particular regions?  The imperial hierarchy forced upon the people of the planet is unethical, inhumane and against international laws.

If we get together and use the creative energy that’s been used in hiding this fact, the economic resources necessary to hide this fact, the human resource of spy networks to hide this fact, the mental energy concocting propaganda journalism to hide this fact, the series of technological advancements to hide this fact, we can certainly manage to create a new world beyond the neo-feudalism.

Peace and love to us all.

Notes.

(1) https://www.facebook.com/luciana.bohne.1/posts/1432873296766408

(2) JFK Files: CIA Plotted To Kill Castro, Stage Bombings In Miami:
http://miami.cbslocal.com/2017/10/27/jfk-files-cia-plotted-kill-castro-stage-bombings-miami/#.WfO2NaVREvY.facebook

(3) Stephen Gowans and his new book “Washington’s Long War on Syria”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXhF5uLqJZA

 

Peace and Love, Beyond the Neo-Feudal Order

Oh “democracy”, an iron fist of tomahawk missiles ripping through flesh and bone.  Oh “freedom”, 1/2 million ascending souls of Iraqi children delivering wealth to the powerful few.  Oh “justice”, a magic wand of fear and death reigning over the wasting hierarchy of money and violence.

Within the framework of imperialism, all of us, regardless of religion, race, gender or ethnicity, are given the divine right to worship power and money. Anyone who frowns upon such an imperial right can be labeled as “racist”, “misogynist”, or “fascist”.  Speaking against the drone war normalized by President Obama might earn you a label “racist”.  Speaking against Hilary Clinton’s wars and corporatism could turn you into a “misogynist”.  Opposing colonial aggression pushed by the two corporate political parties can make you a part of “axis of evil”.  The framework that justifies colonialism, corporatism and militarism in the name of “democracy”, “freedom” and “justice” turns the the population into accomplices of the unimaginable atrocities and inhumanity.

Anyone who attempts to point out the plight of the oppressed due to their religion, race, gender, class or ethnicity can be labeled as “divisive”, “racist”, “sexist” or “fascist”.  The neo-feudal hierarchy must be detached from material reality and remain as an invisible caste order for the system to perpetuate itself by inflicting structural violence in continuing to accumulate power and resources.

That way, such words as “imperialism”, “class”, “capitalism”, “socialism”, “marxism” can be safely handled by the imperialists without causing actual damage to the chilling steepness of the imperial hierarchy, just as such terms as “democracy”, “freedom” and “justice” are freely used by the imperialists to herd the subjects into the framework of  corporatism, colonialism and militarism.

The blunt psychic trauma paralyzes our will and courage as the corporate media machine, academics who sold their principles to the imperial order, corporate agents disguised as elected officials and the rest of the moneyed institutions dismember facts, history, knowledge, communities and our ties to nature, unharnessing our emotions from the material reality that feeds us, harbors us and harmonizes our beings with the planet.  Meanwhile, fear and projection of criminal souls flood the atmosphere with lies and deceptions firmly harnessing our emotions onto schemes of self-inflicted pain, sectarian disputes and unconditional obedience to the ruthless masters of death and suffering.

Ruthlessness.  Why so ruthless?  In describing the imperial trajectory of our time a prominent scholar Lusiana Bohne discusses and quotes George Kennan:

George Kennan, former ambassador to Moscow (1930s) and architect of Cold War’s policy of “containment” (of communism) recommends inequality of international relations in 1948. That’s class war against the world’s nations.

By “we,” George Kennan does not mean the 99% of Americans. He means the 1% of them.

We have about 50% of the world’s wealth but only 6.3% of its population. This disparity is particularly great as between ourselves and the peoples of Asia. In this situation, we cannot fail to be the object of envy and resentment. Our real task in the coming period is to devise a pattern of relationships which will permit us to maintain this position of disparity without positive detriment to our national security. To do so, we will have to dispense with all sentimentality and daydreaming; and our attention will have to be concentrated everywhere on our immediate national objectives. We need not deceive ourselves that we can afford today the luxury of altruism and world benefaction.”– Memo by George Kennan, Head of the US State Department Policy Planning Staff. Written February 28, 1948, Declassified June 17, 1974.

A series of reckless policies, colonial violence and schemes of manipulation have been perpetrated in the process of protecting the order described above.  Among many events instigated, one of the emblematic ones was the assassination of John F Kennedy. It needs to be clearly recognized that the hegemonic power that assassinated President Kennedy did so to insist on the trajectory of wealth/power accumulation within the neo-feudal hierarchy of capitalism.  The US establishment continues to use the nefarious event to make a point that it can do whatever it wishes.

For example, the recent partial disclosure of documents relating to the assassination has indicated that the US government planned to bomb Miami and blame it on Castro.  What’s evil about the obvious attack against the people as well as against humanity itself is not only that the plan itself was horrendously unacceptable. There is also the fact that the government is disclosing such a plan for all to see in order to put fear into the enemies as well as into the American people and the rest of the populations in the western hegemony, clearly manifesting its intention to govern with a bloody iron fist of murders and destruction.  The admission comes with blatant censorships to hide any information leading to any accountability and prosecution of existing organizations or individuals. This guarantees that the government can do anything with impunity.  And this, of course, corresponds to any other instances in which government agencies are said to be involved in horrendous calamities while absolutely lacking on the disclosed details of the involvement.  This sort of fear-based governance is so deeply embraced by the minds of many that political discussions often result in such helpless conclusions by the unsuspecting subjects: “if anyone tries to do anything like that, he or she will be assassinated”.

Meanwhile impossible standards of the highest order are required for the very existence of nations that defy the western economic hegemony: absolute cleanliness, absolute openness, absolute non-violence and absolute adherence to the framework of the western market economy is required by them.  The imperial attacks against them vary from smear campaigns with fabricated stories, demonization of leaders with allegations of crimes that are regularly committed by western leaders, support for violent extremists, instigation of proxy wars, deadly economic sanctions, financial blockades, military intervention and so on and on.1

Dismembered bodies and dislocated people are carefully hidden from our view unless the shock of inhumanity is needed to mobilize a domestic momentum of “democracy” to justify colonial atrocities.  Crying babies, dying elderlies, deaths, sufferings and pains, the urgent signals rushing through our nerves which have guided us in building families, friendships and communities are harvested to drive the war machine.  Our hearts, minds, brains, beliefs, values and norms have been colonized by the force that has built the enormous neo-feudal world of money and violence. That is what they have done to enforce the disparity among us, which really is an invisible global caste order.

Those of us who see through the path of our species must ask the obvious question:  why don’t all nations stand on the same ground in protecting the ways of peoples of particular regions?  The imperial hierarchy forced upon the people of the planet is unethical, inhumane and against international laws.

If we get together and use the creative energy that’s been used in hiding this fact, the economic resources necessary to hide this fact, the human resource of spy networks to hide this fact, the mental energy concocting propaganda journalism to hide this fact, the series of technological advancements to hide this fact, we can certainly manage to create a new world beyond the neo-feudalism.

Peace and love to us all.

  1. Stephen Gowans and his new book Washington’s Long War on Syria.